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dc.contributor.authorKaklamanos, Eleftherios G.
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-19T06:15:59Z
dc.date.available2021-10-19T06:15:59Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.other304-2019.22
dc.identifier.urihttps://repository.mbru.ac.ae/handle/1/565
dc.description.abstractBackground: Recently, the potential impact of different medications on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and the associated root resorption has been systematically reviewed in animal studies and various effects have been shown. However, animal data cannot be extrapolated to human clinical situations directly. Objectives: To systematically investigate the most up to date available evidence from controlled human studies regarding the effect of medication administration on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and associated root resorption development. Search methods: We searched eight databases (covering also grey literature) without restrictions and we performed hand searching up until October 2018. Selection criteria: Controlled studies in humans assessing the effect of various medications on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and root resorption development. Data collection and analysis: Study selection was followed by data extraction and risk of bias assessment using the ROBINS-I tool for non-randomized and the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool for randomized studies. Results: Eight studies, at various risk of bias, were finally identified. With regard to the rate of orthodontic tooth movement, local injections of prostaglandin E1 were found to exert an increasing effect, whereas systemic intake of nabumetone decreased it. Following tenoxicam administration, drinking water with fluoride or local injections of calcitriol (vitamin D metabolite), no significant effects were demonstrated. Concerning root resorption development, nabumetone administration was shown to reduce it, whereas fluoride, overall, was not observed to exert any effect. Only in individuals subjected to heavy orthodontic forces, did fluoride show a protective effect for the period of force application, but not in the longer term during retention. Conclusions: The aforementioned substances may show varying effects on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and root resorption development in human subjects. Despite the observed limitations, the orthodontist should be able to identify patients taking pharmaceuticals and consider any implications related to orthodontic treatment.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectOrthodonticsen_US
dc.subjectTooth Movementen_US
dc.subjectRoot resorption developmenten_US
dc.titleDoes medication administration affect the rate of orthodontic tooth movement and root resorption development in humans? A systematic reviewen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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